WAR FEATURES AN EFP BOMB

March 5, 2024
David Sunnyside

WAR FEATURES AN EFP BOMB

In the world of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), there are a lot of different kinds. Some explode in all directions, sending shrapnel flying, while others are more focused on penetration. One type of IED that is a particular concern for Coalition forces is the explosively formed penetrator (EFP) bomb.

EFP bombs are made from machined copper placed into cheap, everyday objects like coffee cans, jars, or kitchen pots. They've been used extensively by guerilla and militia groups as asymmetric weapons against vehicles and other targets. We've seen them in use in Iraq, but they could become more commonplace in Gaza if Hamas can figure out how to make them.

The EFP bomb works by converting the copper into a projectile that can penetrate armor and destroy targets, reports Wired. It can also swerve to avoid obstacles. It's similar to a basic shaped charge, but it is much more advanced and can create a slug of metal that moves at high speeds (up to a thousand meters per second) rather than a single jet.

Researchers have conducted several studies to understand the behavior of the EFP, including its stability and penetration capability. The EFP is a complex weapon and requires precise engineering to ensure that it can fly over long distances and destroy targets. One of the keys to the EFP's success is its tail fins, which must be stable and able to withstand the shock wave. They also need to be able to pierce steel and other hard materials. The study found that the EFP produced perforation shapes resembling six-petal flowers with a spiral angle on aluminum and cardboard targets.

David Sunnyside
Co-founder of Urban Splatter • Digital Marketer • Engineer • Meditator
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